“Participating libraries pick a list of scholarly books they want to make open access. They pool money to pay publishers a title fee for each of those books. The title fees are meant to cover the cost of publishing each book; publishers calculate what they think is fair and share those estimates with the Knowledge Unlatched group. In return for the title fees, the publishers make Creative Commons-licensed, DRM-free PDFs of the selected books available for free download through the OAPEN digital platform (OAPEN stands for Open Access Publishing in European Networks), the HathiTrust digital repository, and eventually the British Library. Authors and publishers decide which Creative Commons license they’re comfortable using. There’s no postpublication embargo period; the books will be available as soon as the publishers and Knowledge Unlatched can process and upload the PDFs. (Click here for a full list of the books selected for the pilot and whether they’ve been published and uploaded yet.)”
“In Washington, budget cuts have left the nation’s research complex reeling. Labs are closing. Scientists are being laid off. Projects are being put on the shelf, especially in the risky, freewheeling realm of basic research. Yet from Silicon Valley to Wall Street, science philanthropy is hot, as many of the richest Americans seek to reinvent themselves as patrons of social progress through science research. The result is a new calculus of influence and priorities that the scientific community views with a mix of gratitude and trepidation. “For better or worse,” said Steven A. Edwards, a policy analyst at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, “the practice of science in the 21st century is becoming shaped less by national priorities or by peer-review groups and more by the particular preferences of individuals with huge amounts of money.””

Billionaires With Big Ideas Are Privatizing American Science - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

Well, I guess we’re back to this mode of existence for natural philosophers.

infoneer-pulse:

More Than 800,000 Scientific Papers In One Beautiful Infographic

The infographic is a mass of circles. Each circle represents a paper, and the bigger a circle is, the more highly cited it is. The papers are color-coded by discipline—pink for astrophysics, yellow for math, etc.—and papers that share many of the same citations are placed closer together.

» via Popular Science

Looks neat. I wonder how you’d incorporate this into a project/paper of one’s own?

infoneer-pulse:

More Than 800,000 Scientific Papers In One Beautiful Infographic

The infographic is a mass of circles. Each circle represents a paper, and the bigger a circle is, the more highly cited it is. The papers are color-coded by discipline—pink for astrophysics, yellow for math, etc.—and papers that share many of the same citations are placed closer together.

» via Popular Science

Looks neat. I wonder how you’d incorporate this into a project/paper of one’s own?

booksyarnink:

beatonna:

If you aren’t totally quaking in your boots at the news of millions of bees dead, yet again, you’re nuts.

THIS. This has ramifications that people just don’t get yet. Take a look at this article to see what would be missing from store shelves if the bees keep dying.

We lose the bees, we lose fresh fruit, most grains, and so much more. Very scary.

booksyarnink:

beatonna:

If you aren’t totally quaking in your boots at the news of millions of bees dead, yet again, you’re nuts.

THIS. This has ramifications that people just don’t get yet. Take a look at this article to see what would be missing from store shelves if the bees keep dying.

We lose the bees, we lose fresh fruit, most grains, and so much more. Very scary.

We live in a world increasingly dominated by science. And that’s fine. I became a science writer because I think science is the most exciting, dynamic, consequential part of human culture, and I wanted to be a part of that. Also, I have two college-age kids, and I’d be thrilled if they pursued careers in science, engineering or medicine. I certainly want them to learn as much science and math as they can, because those skills can help you get a great job.

But it is precisely because science is so powerful that we need the humanities now more than ever. In your science, mathematics and engineering classes, you’re given facts, answers, knowledge, truth. Your professors say, “This is how things are.” They give you certainty. The humanities, at least the way I teach them, give you uncertainty, doubt and skepticism.

The humanities are subversive. They undermine the claims of all authorities, whether political, religious or scientific. This skepticism is especially important when it comes to claims about humanity, about what we are, where we came from, and even what we can be and should be. Science has replaced religion as our main source of answers to these questions. Science has told us a lot about ourselves, and we’re learning more every day.

But the humanities remind us that we have an enormous capacity for deluding ourselves. They also tell us that every single human is unique, different than every other human, and each of us keeps changing in unpredictable ways. The societies we live in also keep changing–in part because of science and technology! So in certain important ways, humans resist the kind of explanations that science gives us.

Science writer John Horgan responds to the major recent report on the value of the humanities.

Pair with Dorion Sagan on why science and philosophy need each other

(via explore-blog)

Brilliant.

(via jtotheizzoe)

That second and third quoted paragraph really encapsulates things I think. Libraries and librarians can really help with that last paragraph.

(Source: )