“Carney condemned the Amash Amendment as a “blunt approach” that “is not the product of an informed, open, or deliberative process.” That was pretty funny, since Obama has been doing everything in his power to prevent ordinary Americans from learning enough about the government’s surveillance programs to decide for themselves whether they want to exchange their privacy for his promise of safety.”

I rarely say this as a one-liner but:

LOL

Privacy Is Not Partisan - Reason.com

“In fact, the U.S. government is, right this second, pouring untold billions into what is ultimately an effort to monitor all digital communications; scan all mail; amass a fleet of surveillance drones that can hover in the sky for days on end; develop technology to scan all faces in crowds; assemble gigantic databases of biometric data; break all encryption efforts; indiscriminately spy on millions of citizens in friendly countries like Germany and Brazil; and share spy technologies with allies. None of that is in dispute. What’s hyperbolic is calling people hysterical because they see the endgame of various plans to impose ever broader surveillance on whole societies. There isn’t a government document somewhere titled, “The Plan to Destroy Global Privacy,” but that is exactly what Western intelligence agencies will do if adequately funded and left, unopposed, to their own devices. Anyone who can’t see that hasn’t adequately grappled with the implications of Snowden’s revelations, the history of spy agencies allowed to operate in secret, or the radical new capabilities that advances in data analysis and retention have given states (and are likely to give them in the near future if they aren’t stopped).”

The Problem With the ‘Privacy Moderates’ - Politics - The Atlantic

Privacy “moderates”, those who are unwilling to finish the cognitive step to lionize the leakers and whistleblowers is incredibly worrying.

The privacy moderate is deeply uncomfortable with the implications of being allied with Snowden and Greenwald, and against Bush, Cheney, Obama, Clinton, Brennan, Feinstein, and Clapper. The privacy moderate “knows” that Snowden and Greenwald are the radicals; yet the privacy moderate can’t help but stumble toward a conclusion they’re desperate to avoid: the establishment’s policies have implications far more radical than the most strident voices opposing them.

My final take-away and a salient point is this one from the article:

We don’t live in Jefferson’s world. We live in a world where, even if the NSA was abolished, Americans would be far more secure from attacks foreign and domestic than in Jefferson’s day, when multiple foreign powers could’ve credibly invaded and conquered us, and Americans on the frontier were engaged in ongoing skirmishes with understandably hostile Native Americans.

(Via @JasmineMcNealy)

futurejournalismproject:

Erotica Controversies
The 1st District Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted inmate, Andres Martinez, the right to read a werewolf erotica novel in prison. The book in question was The Silver Crown by Mathilde Madden (a pseudonym used by Guardian contributor, Mathilda Gregory).
NPR says the two year legal battle to read the book began when guards at Pelican Bay State Prison confiscated the novel on the grounds that it was pornographic. 
According to TIME, California banned porn from prisons in 2002 to prevent inmates from creating a “hostile work environment” for female guards. But in the 1973 case of Miller vs. California, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if a literary work has scientific or political value, it can’t be deemed “obscene.” Outlawing all works that describe sex would go against the standard. 
So, after 30 pages of decision making, the court decided that the book possesses “serious literary value” and doesn’t qualify as straight up porn. The Warden of Pelican Bay State Prison has been ordered to “allow petitioner to receive, possess, and read his copy of The Silver Crown.” Victory.
And if this erotica scandal isn’t hot enough for the press, the first female deputy CIA director, Avril Haines, is being what Salon calls “slut-shamed” for hosting “erotica nights.”
According to The Daily Beast, in the 1990s, Haines co-owned Adrian’s Book Cafe in Baltimore, Md. The cafe used to feature events where published guests would read their erotic prose. Apparently, Haines even read some racy excerpts herself from Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty Trilogy. 
FJP: What does any of this have to do with the fact that Haines is the new CIA director? Nothing. So why bring it up?
Media Matters suggests that the press applies a “shockingly different standard” to what they cover in regards to accomplished females vs. males in Washington D.C. The media assumes that a woman’s sexuality, or even what she wears, defines who she is (see: Purse Politics: Tote and Vote), and that’s a standard that’s “almost never applied to male counterparts.” 
Would this story be being beaten to death (here, here, here, here, here, and here, to name only a few articles) if Haines was a man who used to be into smutty reading nights? Or is a woman’s sexuality just infinitely more interesting? Also… if a male inmate can read what he wants, shouldn’t Haines have the same right? — Krissy
Image: Salon 

futurejournalismproject:

Erotica Controversies

The 1st District Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted inmate, Andres Martinez, the right to read a werewolf erotica novel in prison. The book in question was The Silver Crown by Mathilde Madden (a pseudonym used by Guardian contributor, Mathilda Gregory).

NPR says the two year legal battle to read the book began when guards at Pelican Bay State Prison confiscated the novel on the grounds that it was pornographic. 

According to TIME, California banned porn from prisons in 2002 to prevent inmates from creating a “hostile work environment” for female guards. But in the 1973 case of Miller vs. California, The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that if a literary work has scientific or political value, it can’t be deemed “obscene.” Outlawing all works that describe sex would go against the standard. 

So, after 30 pages of decision making, the court decided that the book possesses “serious literary value” and doesn’t qualify as straight up porn. The Warden of Pelican Bay State Prison has been ordered to “allow petitioner to receive, possess, and read his copy of The Silver Crown.” Victory.

And if this erotica scandal isn’t hot enough for the press, the first female deputy CIA director, Avril Haines, is being what Salon calls “slut-shamed” for hosting “erotica nights.”

According to The Daily Beast, in the 1990s, Haines co-owned Adrian’s Book Cafe in Baltimore, Md. The cafe used to feature events where published guests would read their erotic prose. Apparently, Haines even read some racy excerpts herself from Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty Trilogy

FJP: What does any of this have to do with the fact that Haines is the new CIA director? Nothing. So why bring it up?

Media Matters suggests that the press applies a “shockingly different standard” to what they cover in regards to accomplished females vs. males in Washington D.C. The media assumes that a woman’s sexuality, or even what she wears, defines who she is (see: Purse Politics: Tote and Vote), and that’s a standard that’s “almost never applied to male counterparts.” 

Would this story be being beaten to death (hereherehereherehere, and here, to name only a few articles) if Haines was a man who used to be into smutty reading nights? Or is a woman’s sexuality just infinitely more interesting? Also… if a male inmate can read what he wants, shouldn’t Haines have the same right? — Krissy

Image: Salon