““With the purchase of series, we look at what does well on piracy sites,” Merryman told Tweakers. One of the shows that Netflix acquired the rights to in the Netherlands is Prison Break, since it is heavily pirated locally. “Prison Break is exceptionally popular on piracy sites,” Merryman says.”

Netflix Uses Pirate Sites to Determine What Shows to Buy | TorrentFreak (via infoneer-pulse)

If this works, (which it looks like it does) then one of the main arguments of “pirates” (the availability one) seems like it holds up to real world testing. If your stuff is being pirated, find more ways of getting it out there in a for-pay format maybe?

Libraries should be in a position to help with this, but we’re not though.

I can’t say that I agree, but this is still funny and inspired.

parislemon:

robsheridan:

Genius.

Ha.

I can’t say that I agree, but this is still funny and inspired.

parislemon:

robsheridan:

Genius.

Ha.

(Source: theinternetsrectum)

“Piracy’s preserving effect, while little known, is actually nothing new. Through the centuries, the tablets, scrolls, and books that people copied most often and distributed most widely survived to the present. Libraries everywhere would be devoid of Homer, Beowulf, and even The Bible without unauthorized duplication.”
Provocative read on why history needs software piracy. Reminiscent of the story of how the widely pirated first edition of Arabian Nights made it one of the most influential pieces of storytelling in history. (via curiositycounts)
infoneer-pulse:

Only 9% (and falling) of US Internet users are P2P pirates


By the end of 2011, penetration of e-readers could reach as high as 35 percent. We’re on a diet of 34GB a day: one-quarter of War and Peace, with books starting to become part of this data mix. In 2008, a total of 3.6 zetabytes of information were consumed.
The book business is now changing more rapidly than any other form of physical media. At this cusp, the industry needs to understand the data being generated, as well as consumed, by customers. In the past year, 25 percent of those surveyed said they’d read both ebooks and print books. Five percent read more e-books than print books.


» via ars technica

infoneer-pulse:

Only 9% (and falling) of US Internet users are P2P pirates

By the end of 2011, penetration of e-readers could reach as high as 35 percent. We’re on a diet of 34GB a day: one-quarter of War and Peace, with books starting to become part of this data mix. In 2008, a total of 3.6 zetabytes of information were consumed.

The book business is now changing more rapidly than any other form of physical media. At this cusp, the industry needs to understand the data being generated, as well as consumed, by customers. In the past year, 25 percent of those surveyed said they’d read both ebooks and print books. Five percent read more e-books than print books.

» via ars technica