infoneer-pulse:

Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet For Over Two Years
From Technology Review:

A quantum internet capable of sending perfectly secure messages has been running at Los Alamos National Labs for the last two and a half years, say researchers. […] Today, Richard Hughes and pals at Los Alamos National Labs in New Mexico reveal an alternative quantum internet, which they say they’ve been running for two and half years. Their approach is to create a quantum network based around a hub and spoke-type network. All messages get routed from any point in the network to another via this central hub.

[read more @techreview] [via @nraford] [paper] [picture by Hughes et al.] 

» via futurescope

Well, this is something. I think I read about a model like this in scifi a long while ago, but here we are anyway.

infoneer-pulse:

Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet For Over Two Years

From Technology Review:

A quantum internet capable of sending perfectly secure messages has been running at Los Alamos National Labs for the last two and a half years, say researchers. […] Today, Richard Hughes and pals at Los Alamos National Labs in New Mexico reveal an alternative quantum internet, which they say they’ve been running for two and half years. Their approach is to create a quantum network based around a hub and spoke-type network. All messages get routed from any point in the network to another via this central hub.

[read more @techreview] [via @nraford] [paper] [picture by Hughes et al.] 

» via futurescope

Well, this is something. I think I read about a model like this in scifi a long while ago, but here we are anyway.

(Source: futurescope)

“It’s an arms race in achievement — and the cost isn’t just a financial one. Studies have documented how it used to be the struggling student who was more likely to cheat, but today college bound students are just as likely to do so when it comes to high-stakes tests and exams. Other research shows that wealthy teens suffer higher rates of depression, anxiety, and substance abuse then teens in other socioeconomic groups. The pressure to succeed along narrow paths is exacting a staggering cost on the values and well being of our children.”

There’s a lot in here about self-directed discovery and learning. I know I could be using the internet a lot more than I am now, but I’m at least aware of it.

The college pressure is insane these days though.

Also, if this is what youth are doing online, what are youth librarians doing to support this outreach?

What Teens Get About the Internet That Parents Don’t - Mimi Ito - The Atlantic (via infoneer-pulse)

Maybe I was just lucky to get into the internet and chatting before the rise of texting, but I’ve taken pains to use regular (if not proper) grammar and to spell out words even if it took longer. Then again, I actively avoided texting beyond minimal “I’m here”, or “come get me” for ages. Still, even if language does shift over time (it does), those who are picking up textspeak will have to communicate with those of us who prefer and demand the extant standards of communication.

To be extra sure of these findings, you should hunt down the studies that spawned this infographic.

(via Infographic: Does Texting Hurt Your Grammar? - SocialTimes)

Maybe I was just lucky to get into the internet and chatting before the rise of texting, but I’ve taken pains to use regular (if not proper) grammar and to spell out words even if it took longer. Then again, I actively avoided texting beyond minimal “I’m here”, or “come get me” for ages. Still, even if language does shift over time (it does), those who are picking up textspeak will have to communicate with those of us who prefer and demand the extant standards of communication.

To be extra sure of these findings, you should hunt down the studies that spawned this infographic.

(via Infographic: Does Texting Hurt Your Grammar? - SocialTimes)

“Imagine an Internet where unseen hands curate your entire experience. Where third parties predetermine the news, products and prices you see—even the people you meet. A world where you think you are making choices, but in reality, your options are narrowed and refined until you are left with merely the illusion of control. This is not far from what is happening today. Thanks to technology that enables Google, Facebook and others to gather information about us and use it to tailor the user experience to our own personal tastes, habits and income, the Internet has become a different place for the rich and for the poor. Most of us have become unwitting actors in an unfolding drama about the tale of two Internets. There is yours and mine, theirs and ours.”

An alarmist opinion piece, but one with truth in it. “Personalization” and other practices mine your online experiences for others and charge them access to that data. And with that data in the hands of marketers and salespeople we get optimized pricing and marketing. If the anonymous and “non-personally identifiable” data that gets sold lets people decide that you don’t need to see things, then it will be very hard for you to find them.

The Rich See a Different Internet Than the Poor: Scientific American (via ehbeesea3)

libraryadvocates:

nedroidcomics:

The Internet.

Copyright: get the facts.

No additional comment needed. Remember to cite your sources!

libraryadvocates:

nedroidcomics:

The Internet.

Copyright: get the facts.

No additional comment needed. Remember to cite your sources!

““The results from our sample sets indicate that range from 35%-90% of the Web has at least one archived copy,” they write. Think about how different those two numbers are. Either we’re capturing almost all the web or we’re capturing barely more than a third of it.”

How Much of the Web Is Archived? Truth Is, We Don’t Really Know - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic (via infoneer-pulse)

Reading things like this makes me sad. The Internet Archive is a good start, but there’s just too much stuff. And unlike regular material, there will be so much less of a chance for archaeologists (of some kind) to dig it up. The raw storage material will decay and we could lose 65% of the internet. And that’s just the stuff we have only a single copy of.