“What’s happening with these court cases will determine the future of the music publishing and songwriting industries,” said David Israelite, the president of the National Music Publishers’ Association. “It is simply unfair to ask songwriters and publishers to be paid something less than a fair market rate for their intellectual property.”

Pandora Suit May Upend Century-Old Royalty Plan - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

Interesting to see how this will turn out.

“What remains to be seen is if we as a nation, will come to our senses on this issue and get back in step with the rest of the world. Especially since we are rapidly approaching a point where the international disparities of what is and isn’t available in a given public domain are going to become increasingly apparent, especially given the nature of electronic media.”
“The best word to describe yesterday’s oral argument at the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in regard to the appeal of the Georgia State University e-reserves decision is probably bizarre. But that has to be qualified; they were bizarre in a very discouraging direction for GSU and fair use in the academy.”

A discouraging day in court for GSU | Scholarly Communications @ Duke (via arlpolicynotes)

In light of the celebrations about the google books case and Hathi Trust, comes this other, not so happy tale from Georgia.

ursamajor:


Days when I’m glad I haven’t yet bought an e-reader, because WTF is this shit.

Transcription:
Copying not allowed.
Printing not allowed.
Lending not allowed.
Reading aloud not allowed.
Never expires.


(via Twitter / logandecker: Adobe’s getting serious about …)


Reading aloud counts as public performance (or at least it could) and the ebook distributor never got rights to enable that. Yay for licensing rules.

ursamajor:

Days when I’m glad I haven’t yet bought an e-reader, because WTF is this shit.

Transcription:
  • Copying not allowed.
  • Printing not allowed.
  • Lending not allowed.
  • Reading aloud not allowed.
  • Never expires.

(via Twitter / logandecker: Adobe’s getting serious about …)

Reading aloud counts as public performance (or at least it could) and the ebook distributor never got rights to enable that. Yay for licensing rules.

“I really cannot fathom how anyone would say that the blind are thieves when accessible copies of books are not even available for purchase.”
““With the purchase of series, we look at what does well on piracy sites,” Merryman told Tweakers. One of the shows that Netflix acquired the rights to in the Netherlands is Prison Break, since it is heavily pirated locally. “Prison Break is exceptionally popular on piracy sites,” Merryman says.”

Netflix Uses Pirate Sites to Determine What Shows to Buy | TorrentFreak (via infoneer-pulse)

If this works, (which it looks like it does) then one of the main arguments of “pirates” (the availability one) seems like it holds up to real world testing. If your stuff is being pirated, find more ways of getting it out there in a for-pay format maybe?

Libraries should be in a position to help with this, but we’re not though.