“This decision is a crucial victory," said Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) Intellectual Property Director Corynne McSherry. "We are thrilled that a higher court has recognized that it is unfair to sue thousands of people at once, in a court far from home, based on nothing more than an allegation that they joined a BitTorrent swarm.”

Crushing Blow for Copyright Trolls: Appeals Court Halts AF Holdings’ Extortion Scheme | Electronic Frontier Foundation (via infoneer-pulse)

Some good news here. It feels like a hack of the system, but then again, the joining of bittorent swarms was a hack to start with.

chrischelberg:

(via xkcd: Old Files)

Digital Archiving. Or, a personal example of the benefits of digital preservation and migration.

Also, an EV Override shout out.

Always remember to use the permalink and not just the initial comic main page for archival reasons. And depending on your relationship to things and bandwidth, use a locally/self hosted image as well.

chrischelberg:

(via xkcd: Old Files)

Digital Archiving. Or, a personal example of the benefits of digital preservation and migration.

Also, an EV Override shout out.

Always remember to use the permalink and not just the initial comic main page for archival reasons. And depending on your relationship to things and bandwidth, use a locally/self hosted image as well.

The latest attack on first sale comes from Aspen Publishers, and the target is the lucrative textbook market. Aspen is insisting that students who are assigned and purchase physical textbooks Aspen published cannot resell those books to recoup some of the expense.

Aspen’s announced its move in an email to professors. In the coming academic year, Aspen declares, its popular property law case book will only be available under a so-called ‘Connected Casebook’ program. Students will still pay full price (a cool $200) but will be required to return their casebooks at the end of the semester. Students will supposedly also receive “lifetime” access to a digital companion to the casebook. But, as Professor James Grimmelmann noted, “we know from sad experience that gerbils have better life expectancy than DRM platforms.”

Aspen to Students: Your Property Book is Not Your Property

(via librarianrafia)

And if it sticks here, others will emulate elsewhere.

“In order for a defendant to be found liable for contributory copyright infringement there must first be evidence of direct infringement carried out by others. In other words, to proceed against Gawker, Tarantino’s lawyers needed to show that visitors to Gawker’s site who read the article in question actually clicked the links to AnonFiles or Scribd and went on to commit direct infringement on the script. “However, nowhere in these paragraphs or anywhere else in the Complaint does Plaintiff allege a single act of direct infringement committed by any member of the general public that would support Plaintiff’s claim for contributory infringement. Instead, Plaintiff merely speculates that some direct infringement must have taken place,” wrote U.S. District Judge John F. Walter in his ruling.”

Viewing Pirated Material Is Not Direct Copyright Infringement, Judge Tells Tarantino | TorrentFreak (via infoneer-pulse)

Some interesting opinions here on indirect copyright infringement. As well as on the use of embedded frames.

“What’s happening with these court cases will determine the future of the music publishing and songwriting industries,” said David Israelite, the president of the National Music Publishers’ Association. “It is simply unfair to ask songwriters and publishers to be paid something less than a fair market rate for their intellectual property.”

Pandora Suit May Upend Century-Old Royalty Plan - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

Interesting to see how this will turn out.