“New contracts are also said to include MFN clauses, whereby effectively books cannot be sold for a lower price than Amazon’s anywhere, including on a publisher’s own website. Amazon is also understood to want matching terms where a publisher enters into a new business arrangement, for example with a subscription service. Publishers told The Bookseller that MFN clauses had disappeared from contracts, but were now making a reappearance. Another clause of particular note requires publishers to guarantee they have books in stock, allowing Amazon to do print-on-demand editions to customers – with extra terms benefits – should books be out of supply. The clause has echoes of a demand made in 2008 that small publishers use its POD service, with Amazon arguing at that time that it could “provide a better, more timely customer experience if the p.o.d. titles are printed inside our own fulfilment centres”. Publishers are worried that the clause would allow Amazon to effectively take over their stock-control.”

Amazon pressing for new terms in UK | The Bookseller (via infoneer-pulse)

If the on demand publishing bit in their warehouses and distribution centers is true (and it makes a lot of sense for it to be true) then this is how Amazon plans on taking over the publishing world. It could be considered a form of low-end disruption (Maybe, it depends on how publishers see the need to fill out of stock books, and if Amazon can do it more cheaply (lower margin) than the publishers can), but we’ll see. It still amuses me (darkly) that this is the same Amazon who managed to provoke the trial that ruled that Apple couldn’t have MFN clauses, and they’re the underdog in this market.

“This is a canny economic move by Bezos and Amazon, of course — it’s not do-good charity meant to incite literacy and save the publishing industry. MatchBook takes advantage of the giant purchase history that Amazon has for all of its customers, and encourages those customers to buy (and, incidentally, to read) more. It also takes advantage of a new and nervous mega-literacy. That mega-literacy, in which driving-while-texting is a common and fatal practice, is predicated on the idea that we must always be reading. This obsession is akin to the delusion (and actively-promoted illusion) of food scarcity that has led, in part, to American overconsumption of food for 40 years. What does it mean to read—and screen—too much? At the biological and ethical level, we’re only now finding out. Hypotheses—alarmist, optimistic and otherwise—abound. At the economic level, it means that we’re buying copies of books we already have—suffusing our screens and bookshelves, along with our pantries, with hopeful redundancies, with stuff we don’t need. Hoarding stuff, both binary and tactile. Increasing the clog, not diminishing it. You know, the American way.”

Jeff Bezos, Kindle Matchbook and the American literacy epidemic - Yahoo! News (via infoneer-pulse)

A worrying trend, but I’m not sure that it’s clog when you buy new things, or want the searchability of digital texts. But yeah, reading everyday.

Also, if we are reading all the time, then libraries should be getting in to more of this time (and we are doing ok/good when it comes to patron usage).

text-block:

lecieltumultueux:

professionalbooknerd:



harperperennial:

superamit:

LibraryLookup is the bomb.
It takes you directly from an Amazon’s book page to its listing on your library’s website. From there it’s just a few clicks to place a hold or request!
Amazon’s 100x better for browsing books than your library’s site, so this gives you the best of both.
The LibraryLookup bookmarklet works with most libraries but you’ll need the Chrome plugin* for San Francisco.
Use your library!
p.s. Thanks to nickbaum for the book recommendation!
* You may have to do some convincing to get Chrome to install it.

This looks pretty slick. Anyone else using it?



This is certainly one way to figure out how to deal with Amazon. 

Library Extension is another Chrome extension that tells you how many copies are currently available at your local library!

Library Extension works beautifully in Chrome for my local public library, and I’ve gotten the LibraryLookup bookmarklet to work in Chrome for my state’s academic consortium (which I work for). 

Some good stuff here. The tech seems to be mostly here, now it’s a matter of outreach.

text-block:

lecieltumultueux:

professionalbooknerd:

harperperennial:

superamit:

LibraryLookup is the bomb.

It takes you directly from an Amazon’s book page to its listing on your library’s website. From there it’s just a few clicks to place a hold or request!

Amazon’s 100x better for browsing books than your library’s site, so this gives you the best of both.

The LibraryLookup bookmarklet works with most libraries but you’ll need the Chrome plugin* for San Francisco.

Use your library!

p.s. Thanks to nickbaum for the book recommendation!

* You may have to do some convincing to get Chrome to install it.

This looks pretty slick. Anyone else using it?

This is certainly one way to figure out how to deal with Amazon. 

Library Extension is another Chrome extension that tells you how many copies are currently available at your local library!

Library Extension works beautifully in Chrome for my local public library, and I’ve gotten the LibraryLookup bookmarklet to work in Chrome for my state’s academic consortium (which I work for). 

Some good stuff here. The tech seems to be mostly here, now it’s a matter of outreach.