“This is a canny economic move by Bezos and Amazon, of course — it’s not do-good charity meant to incite literacy and save the publishing industry. MatchBook takes advantage of the giant purchase history that Amazon has for all of its customers, and encourages those customers to buy (and, incidentally, to read) more. It also takes advantage of a new and nervous mega-literacy. That mega-literacy, in which driving-while-texting is a common and fatal practice, is predicated on the idea that we must always be reading. This obsession is akin to the delusion (and actively-promoted illusion) of food scarcity that has led, in part, to American overconsumption of food for 40 years. What does it mean to read—and screen—too much? At the biological and ethical level, we’re only now finding out. Hypotheses—alarmist, optimistic and otherwise—abound. At the economic level, it means that we’re buying copies of books we already have—suffusing our screens and bookshelves, along with our pantries, with hopeful redundancies, with stuff we don’t need. Hoarding stuff, both binary and tactile. Increasing the clog, not diminishing it. You know, the American way.”

Jeff Bezos, Kindle Matchbook and the American literacy epidemic - Yahoo! News (via infoneer-pulse)

A worrying trend, but I’m not sure that it’s clog when you buy new things, or want the searchability of digital texts. But yeah, reading everyday.

Also, if we are reading all the time, then libraries should be getting in to more of this time (and we are doing ok/good when it comes to patron usage).

text-block:

lecieltumultueux:

professionalbooknerd:



harperperennial:

superamit:

LibraryLookup is the bomb.
It takes you directly from an Amazon’s book page to its listing on your library’s website. From there it’s just a few clicks to place a hold or request!
Amazon’s 100x better for browsing books than your library’s site, so this gives you the best of both.
The LibraryLookup bookmarklet works with most libraries but you’ll need the Chrome plugin* for San Francisco.
Use your library!
p.s. Thanks to nickbaum for the book recommendation!
* You may have to do some convincing to get Chrome to install it.

This looks pretty slick. Anyone else using it?



This is certainly one way to figure out how to deal with Amazon. 

Library Extension is another Chrome extension that tells you how many copies are currently available at your local library!

Library Extension works beautifully in Chrome for my local public library, and I’ve gotten the LibraryLookup bookmarklet to work in Chrome for my state’s academic consortium (which I work for). 

Some good stuff here. The tech seems to be mostly here, now it’s a matter of outreach.

text-block:

lecieltumultueux:

professionalbooknerd:

harperperennial:

superamit:

LibraryLookup is the bomb.

It takes you directly from an Amazon’s book page to its listing on your library’s website. From there it’s just a few clicks to place a hold or request!

Amazon’s 100x better for browsing books than your library’s site, so this gives you the best of both.

The LibraryLookup bookmarklet works with most libraries but you’ll need the Chrome plugin* for San Francisco.

Use your library!

p.s. Thanks to nickbaum for the book recommendation!

* You may have to do some convincing to get Chrome to install it.

This looks pretty slick. Anyone else using it?

This is certainly one way to figure out how to deal with Amazon. 

Library Extension is another Chrome extension that tells you how many copies are currently available at your local library!

Library Extension works beautifully in Chrome for my local public library, and I’ve gotten the LibraryLookup bookmarklet to work in Chrome for my state’s academic consortium (which I work for). 

Some good stuff here. The tech seems to be mostly here, now it’s a matter of outreach.

One other distinction that seems to have cropped up as these cultures collide is where authors and publishers fit in. Goodreads tolerates a lot of marketing and is much more attractive to publishers, authors, and…well, Amazon.

LibraryThing has a welcome mat for authors and publishers, but there are distinct social boundaries that the community has set beyond which marketing and promotion is unwelcome. The terms of service states clearly, “Do not use LibraryThing as an advertising medium. Egregious commercial solicitation is forbidden. No matter how great your novel, this does apply to authors.”

Librarian Barbara Fister holding forth on the tribal and technological differences between Goodreads and LibraryThing. If you’re entertaining leaving Goodreads in the wake of the news about Amazon buying the social reading site, I recommend digesting her fine articulation.  

I may have to chime in with my own piece on the ramifications the sale of Goodreads could have on readers’ advisory.

(via cloudunbound)

Worth a read indeed